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 Database Resources (5) | Local Resources (7) | State Resources (3) | National Resources (3)

 

When you're looking for a job, it's important to go beyond "the classifieds".
Many jobs are not in the newspaper, but you can find out about them by:

  • networking with other people
  • submitting your resume to an online service
  • researching companies in the area

Find books from the library about Searching for a Job.

DATABASE RESOURCES

Access a library of rich adult skill building content and live, professional assistance in resume/cover letter writing, U.S. citizenship prep, MS Office Essential Skills Series, and more!

Job seekers can explore career choices, assess likes, abilities and strengths, research specific job salaries, and map a career path or practice certification tests for a variety of vocations.

Get detailed information on occupations that suit your interests. Access current job listings from over 5 million job postings, which are collected from all major job boards. Create professional resumes and cover letters, master interviewing and networking techniques, and more. Job & Career Accelerator is your guide to getting hired!

LearningExpress Library is a one-stop shop for learning skills that can help you get a better job. Whether you need to practice so you can pass your GED, improve your reading, writing or math skills, or practice to pass a test like the Real Estate or Firefighter Exam, the LearningExpress Library has something for you.

Find out more about companies you might want to work for.

LOCAL RESOURCES   

Whatcom County WorkSource Office helps businesses find workers, and helps workers find jobs. The WorkSource Career Center can help you find a job, improve your skills, or explore a new career.

 The Bellingham Herald job classified ads.  Yes, there are still good jobs advertised in the newspaper!

 Craigslist is free, so some local employers use it to save money when they are looking for new workers. Be sure to read through the “scam warnings” before you start job-hunting with Craigslist.

Women looking for work need to be very aware of their appearance when they are meeting with people who might be able to hire them. The Back to Work Boutique at the Bellingham YWCA makes work clothes (including suits, dresses, and work-appropriate shoes) available for low-income women.

The Whatcom Volunteer Center can help you find many ways to help other people locally. Volunteering lets you use your skills in unpaid work that you can add to your resume, learn new skills, and increase your number of local contacts. Volunteering can also add a feeling of value and purpose to your time. Click on the 1-800-volunteer.org link to learn about volunteer work that is happening in the next few days.

 Help others learn how to read, improve their English, or do math. You can tutor people one-on-one, or volunteer in local adult education classrooms as a classroom tutor.

Volunteering for the Opportunity Council helps you help people in your community.

STATE RESOURCES   

For students at Western Washington University and other local schools, WWU’s Job Board lists short-term, local jobs that people need done. From landscaping work to nannying to photography and design, the WWU Job Board is a great source for finding casual-labor jobs that are not listed in other places.

A list of all jobs with Washington State Government offices. Find out more about job benefits, search for job openings and sign up for e-mail job alerts.

A one-stop list of links to all jobs at community colleges, technical colleges, and universities in Washington State.

NATIONAL RESOURCES   

AmeriCorps offers opportunities to help people to solve problems locally. AmeriCorps volunteers serve a one-year term. After completing their service successfully, volunteers may be eligible for an education grant. You can use an education grant to pay for more education, or to pay back student loans. Some programs have an age limit of 18-24, but others are open to anyone over 17 or 18 years of age.

USA Jobs is a one-stop resource for jobs with the United States Federal Government.

Want to go further -- even abroad? Peace Corps volunteers help people in other countries do important work in areas such as education, community development, health, nutrition, farming, and technology. You don’t need to speak another language, and no one is too old to volunteer. Volunteers can be single or married couples, and will serve for a two-year term in the country where their skills are most needed.